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June 16, 2011 / Mika Riedel

We Draw Faces With Assorted Paints.

Today’s program was a drawing event. We drew faces by crayons, paints, markers, and so on.

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The place was at Ishinomaki High School. Did the mischievous kids draw just as planned?  No, it was tough.

When we arrived at the evacuation center, some kids were playing Nintendo DS. It was no easy task for us to have them start drawing.

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It was beautiful weather, so we decided to draw outside.

First, we spread out a tarp on the ground and we linked together some paper on the tarp to make a large drawing paper. Next, we let a mischievous boy lie face up on the large paper, and then Onchan-Shisho traced his body’s shape on the paper.

That was enough for kids to start gathering around the paper. The kids began to draw on blank space around the figure as they liked.

We thought we’d had some success catching the kids’ interests, but then heavy rain suddenly started. We took the stuff inside immediately, and the lying boy was carried wrapped up in the sheet.

Today’s activity was making faces by papers, so we started this program again inside.  For a starter, we ripped the papers to egg-shapes and stuck each egg on another paper by glue. Oh, no. Don’t stick it to the tarp, sweetie, we said to the mischievous boy.

In the same way, we made eyes and a nose from ripping the papers. As it was hard for some kids, they drew the faces directly on the paper. Every kid seemed to create the faces as they liked.

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During today’s program, TV cameras were rolling.

After finishing drawing faces, we painted the faces flesh color. The boy who lay on the sheet outside used blue for his face’s color. The textured marks from the crayons looked pretty.  At the end, we signed our names to the pictures.

May 8th was Mother’s day in Japan, so we finally gave the pictures to their mothers. All the kids really did a good job.

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The kid is giving his drawing and a carnation to his mother.

Written by Kodomo Hinanjo Club on 5/8/2011.

Translated by Kayako Mukainakano & Eric Draper on 5/14/2011.

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